doi.bio/demis_hassabis


Demis Hassabis

Early Life and Education

Demis Hassabis was born in 1976 to a Greek Cypriot father and a Chinese Singaporean mother and grew up in North London. A child prodigy in chess from the age of four, Hassabis reached master standard at the age of 13 with an Elo rating of 2300. He captained many of the England junior chess teams and represented the University of Cambridge in the Oxford-Cambridge varsity chess matches from 1995 to 1997.

Between 1988 and 1990, Hassabis attended Queen Elizabeth's School, a boys' grammar school in North London. He was then home-schooled by his parents, during which time he bought his first computer, a ZX Spectrum 48K, and taught himself how to program. He later attended Christ's College, a state-funded comprehensive school in East Finchley, North London, completing his A-levels and scholarship-level exams two years early.

University of Cambridge

At the request of Cambridge University, Hassabis took a gap year due to his young age. During this time, he began his career in computer games at Bullfrog Productions, first as a level designer and then as a co-designer and lead programmer on the 1994 game "Theme Park". The game sold several million copies and inspired a whole genre of simulation sandbox games.

Hassabis then left Bullfrog to study at Queens' College, Cambridge, where he completed a degree in Computer Science, graduating in 1997 with a Double First.

Career

After graduating, Hassabis worked at Lionhead Studios as a lead AI programmer on the 2001 "god" game "Black & White". In 1998, he left Lionhead to found Elixir Studios, a London-based independent games developer. In addition to managing the company, Hassabis served as executive designer of the BAFTA-nominated games "Republic: The Revolution" and "Evil Genius".

Following Elixir Studios, Hassabis returned to academia to obtain his PhD in cognitive neuroscience from University College London (UCL) in 2009. He continued his research as a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University before earning a postdoctoral research fellowship at UCL in 2009.

Hassabis is currently the CEO and co-founder of DeepMind, a machine learning AI startup founded in London in 2010. DeepMind aims to combine insights from systems neuroscience with new developments in machine learning and computing hardware to unlock powerful general-purpose learning algorithms. The company has focused on training algorithms to master games, such as Breakout and AlphaGo, an AI program that beat the world's top Go player.

In 2014, Google purchased DeepMind for £400 million, allowing the company to operate independently. Since the acquisition, DeepMind has achieved several significant milestones, including the creation of AlphaGo, a program that defeated world champion Lee Sedol at the complex game of Go.

More recently, DeepMind turned its attention to protein folding, a long-standing challenge in biology. In 2018, DeepMind's tool AlphaFold won the 13th Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) by successfully predicting the most accurate structure for 25 out of 43 proteins. In 2020, AlphaFold again achieved world-beating results in the CASP14 edition of the competition.

Hassabis has received numerous awards and recognitions for his work, including the Breakthrough Prize, the Canada Gairdner International Award, and the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. In 2017, he was appointed a CBE and listed in the Time 100 most influential people. In 2024, he was knighted for his services to AI.

Selected Works and Publications

- They have also pioneered the field of deep reinforcement learning, which combines deep learning and reinforcement learning methods.

Demis Hassabis

Early Life and Education

Demis Hassabis, born on July 27, 1976, is a British computer scientist, artificial intelligence researcher, and entrepreneur. He was born to a Greek Cypriot father and a Chinese Singaporean mother and grew up in North London. Hassabis was a child prodigy in chess, achieving master standard at the age of 13 with an Elo rating of 2300. He represented the University of Cambridge in chess matches from 1995 to 1997.

For his early education, Hassabis attended Queen Elizabeth's School, Barnet, and later Christ's College, Finchley, completing his A-levels and scholarship-level exams two years early. At the age of 15, he bought his first computer, a ZX Spectrum 48K, and taught himself how to program. He then took a gap year before starting his undergraduate studies at Cambridge, during which he began his career in computer games at Bullfrog Productions.

University of Cambridge

Hassabis studied Computer Science at Queens' College, Cambridge, graduating in 1997 with a Double First. After graduating, he worked at Lionhead Studios as a lead AI programmer on the game Black & White.

Career and Research

In 1998, Hassabis left Lionhead to found Elixir Studios, a London-based independent game developer. He served as executive designer of the BAFTA-nominated games Republic: The Revolution and Evil Genius.

Following his time at Elixir Studios, Hassabis returned to academia and obtained his PhD in cognitive neuroscience from University College London (UCL) in 2009. He then continued his research as a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University before earning a postdoctoral research fellowship at UCL in 2009.

Hassabis has co-authored several influential papers published in prestigious scientific journals such as Nature, Science, Neuron, and PNAS. His research focuses on imagination, memory, and amnesia, and he has made significant contributions to our understanding of the link between imagination and episodic memory recall.

In 2010, Hassabis co-founded DeepMind, a machine learning AI startup, along with Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. DeepMind aims to combine insights from neuroscience with advancements in machine learning and computing hardware to create artificial general intelligence (AGI).

DeepMind has achieved several notable accomplishments, including the creation of AlphaGo, a program that defeated the world champion at the complex game of Go, and AlphaFold, a tool that predicts the 3D structure of proteins, solving a 50-year grand challenge in science.

In 2014, Google acquired DeepMind for £400 million, and Hassabis became the CEO and co-founder of Google DeepMind. He has also been appointed as a UK Government AI Advisor and has received numerous awards for his contributions to AI and science, including the Breakthrough Prize, the Canada Gairdner International Award, and a knighthood in 2024 for services to AI.

Awards and Honours

Games and Competitions

In addition to his research and entrepreneurial pursuits, Hassabis is an accomplished player of various games, including:

- Multi-games events: Five-time World Pentamind Champion and two-time World Decamentathlon Champion at the London Mind Sports Olympiad

Demis Hassabis

Early Life and Education

Demis Hassabis, born on 27 July 1976, is a British computer scientist, artificial intelligence researcher, and entrepreneur. He was born to a Greek Cypriot father and a Chinese Singaporean mother and grew up in North London. Hassabis was a child prodigy in chess, achieving master standard at the age of 13 with an Elo rating of 2300. He represented the University of Cambridge in chess matches from 1995 to 1997.

For his early education, Hassabis attended Queen Elizabeth's School, Barnet, and later Christ's College, Finchley, completing his A-levels and scholarship-level exams two years early. He then took a gap year and began working at Bullfrog Productions, designing video games. During this time, he also co-designed and lead-programmed the 1994 game "Theme Park."

Hassabis later attended Queens' College, Cambridge, where he studied computer science and graduated with a Double First in 1997.

Career

After graduating, Hassabis worked at Lionhead Studios as a lead AI programmer on the game "Black & White." In 1998, he left Lionhead to found Elixir Studios, a London-based independent game developer. He served as executive designer for the BAFTA-nominated games "Republic: The Revolution" and "Evil Genius."

Following his time at Elixir Studios, Hassabis returned to academia and obtained his PhD in cognitive neuroscience from University College London (UCL) in 2009. He continued his research as a visiting scientist at MIT and Harvard University before earning a postdoctoral research fellowship at UCL in 2009.

Hassabis is currently the CEO and co-founder of DeepMind, a machine learning AI startup founded in London in 2010. DeepMind aims to combine insights from neuroscience with new developments in machine learning and computing hardware to create artificial general intelligence (AGI). In 2014, Google purchased DeepMind for £400 million, and Hassabis has since been tasked with turning AI research into profits for the company.

DeepMind has achieved several notable accomplishments, including the creation of AlphaGo, a program that defeated the world champion at the complex game of Go, and AlphaFold, a tool that predicts the structure of proteins, solving a 50-year grand challenge in science.

Awards and Recognition

Hassabis has received numerous awards and recognition for his work, including:

Conclusion

Demis Hassabis is a renowned computer scientist, artificial intelligence researcher, and entrepreneur. He has made significant contributions to the field of AI through his work at DeepMind and has received numerous awards and recognition for his achievements. Hassabis continues to play a key role in advancing AI research and its practical applications within Google.




sness@sness.net